Coffee With

Coffee With is an app that helps you discover people in your area who share your interests and makes it easy to meet up with them. It matches you with potential friends based on shared interests, then suggests a place and time to meet that fits both your preferences. I designed this concept, branding, UX, prototype, and pitch video as part of a design course in interaction.

2017

chatspace

chatspace was a collaborative project with Marissa Dickson and Mason Goolsby exploring digital intimacy.

We set up a small comfortable space, evocative of a bedroom. Upon entering the space, participants scanned a QR code that brought them to a text-based chatbot we had created, which struck up a conversation.

As the conversation progressed, the chatbot's questions became more personal and existential. At the same time, we simulated a presence in the room by adjusting the music and colors based on the participant's answers to questions about their preferences.

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The goal of the installation was to draw out the tension of communicating with someone online and feeling an emotional connection without experiencing them in any tangible, physical way. We also explored a similar tension of questioning the reality of the chatbot—if it was a bot, if it was a person, if we had rigged the whole thing—and the dissonance of feeling intimacy with something that may not be human.

Experience the digital portion of our installation here.

2018

Persephone

Persephone is a nonlinear digital retelling of the myth of Persephone's descent to the underworld. To piece together the narrative, the reader must navigate through the pages of the website, exploring interactive elements and poem fragments, before making a final choice that decides the ending of the story.

Explore the full project here.

2018

Press One

This piece addresses political radicalization and discomfort. I wanted to recreate the feeling of discomfort when you're faced with viewpoints just slightly more radical than your own.

Users were prompted to press one of two buttons in response to images of protest signs. As the game continued the signs grew more radical, and the buttons pressed caused the animated graphic to change in size and frequency.

I was curious to see how far people got into the progression before abandoning it, and what their graphic looked like when they either reached the end or gave up. The following are all frames from the night of the installation.

2017